Another Gallery Closing in Phoenix

This is so sad. I’ve lost count of the galleries that have closed in the last few years. Chartreuse was very well respected, a must see destination on Grand Ave on first and third Friday art walk nights. We will miss gallerist Nancy Hill’s well chosen shows.

http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/arts/nancy-hill-to-close-chartreuse-gallery-on-grand-avenue-in-downtown-phoenix-8768120

Chartreuse is still open now, and will be through December.

The gallery is in the Bragg’s Pie Factory building. During earlier and current iterations of a gallery in the space, I had participated in some group shows there. Chartreuse is about a block from {9} The Gallery where I had a solo show this Sept.

It’ll be sad to walk Grand during art walks and not see Nancy’s shows after Dec. I hope that the space will be a gallery again after that. Galleries are all struggling, it seems. Even Scottsdale, the upper end of our art world here, has seen galleries close or move to Phoenix, scale back, or rent space. I may be doing a lot more sales from my studio if this keeps happening!

Chicken Portrait, Herberger gallery at AZ Center

tuckerderivpainting_schnackel

Work in progress; I had not yet finished some details here.

A few weeks ago, photographer Archie Tucker and his photographer wife Connie Tucker asked me to participate in a show at the Herberger Gallery at Arizona Center. The gallery is fairly new and has a variety of local artists and photographers. The invitation was to create a derivative work, a painting based on one of their photos. They wanted me to paint from one of their beautiful chicken portraits that I’d previously “Liked” on their Facebook page. I didn’t do an exact copy, but I wanted to stick pretty close to it, as I loved the dark background and the chicken’s various textures. I suspect that chicken was part silkie, because it had fur-like feathers but a red comb, (silkies usually have black combs). There are lots of delightful silkie crosses, and silkies are so near and dear to my heart.

Here is the finished painting, which is now hanging in the Herberger gallery, and will be there for about a month.

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“Chicken Portrait,” Acrylic on deep edged panel, 20 x 16 in. Cindy Schnackel, from photo by Archie Tucker with permission, 2016.

I was asked about doing another for later in November and I would sure like to. A hummingbird this time most likely! Now I need to go buy a plant that hummers like, so I can sit outside and sketch them before I embark on a painting of one! Oh the horrors, to ‘have to’ go buy flowers! ­čśÇ

Herberger Gallery at Arizona Center

455 N. 3rd St. Ste 1200

(602) 254-7399

The gallery has more open hours than many of those on the first and third Friday art walk routes, but call first if you plan to go, to be sure what the hours that day are. To make sure you don’t go to the wrong gallery,┬ágo to the one in the AZ Center, which is a shopping/dining area. Confusion could arise because the┬áHerberger Theater Center across the street from the AZ Center also has a gallery.

Herberger at AZ Center Facebook page

Archie (A.O. Tucker) and Connie’s site

The Price of Art Supplies!

I won’t publish the photo of the painting panels that cost $134 for a pack of 10, 8×10 in., panels, it might not set well with the store or the brand. ┬áThe panels were double sided which, since they were marketed as handy for outdoor painting, could be ok. But what if both sides ended up being something you would sell? If they were only for studies, then there are much cheaper panels made of paper, or heck, why not repurpose something like cardboard coated with gesso? For keepers, two sided does not make sense. For disposables, expensive does not make sense.┬áNonetheless, it speaks to the fact we can’t sell our work for peanuts!

The other panels I looked at had suddenly jumped in price since I last bought a few for work I did this year. Small uncradled panels that used to cost me two-six dollars were now more like six to ten dollars. Cradled ones were insane! One brand of cradled panels in 8×8 in was about $25 and that was the “sale” price! I looked at the labels of at least three or four brands. One that had formerly been all American made now had ┬á“Made in China” on it. So there goes any advantage to paying more for American made.

brushclean

My favorite brush cleaner, 24 oz tub, lasts me at least a year!

Usually, I wait until I get a coupon or there is a sale, to buy the large size or really expensive items. Michaels seems to be the only store that carries the large tub of my favorite brush cleaner. Even at half off with a coupon it’s not cheap, but it lasts a long time so over time it’s still economical. Last time I bought a tub, about a year ago, it was in the 20’s or 30s, now it is over $40. It’ll make me consider switching to a liquid that I bought some small bottles of to try, to see whether they are more economical, but I doubt they will be. The solid cake as in the picture has virtually no waste, an important factor in how economical it is to use. Also never evaporates or dries up and can’t spill!

Brushes have always been costly for good ones. Lately, the good ones seem to be of less quality though, making me consider cheaper ones. A number of ‘good’ brushes are also made in countries known for cheap junk. The heads wobble in the store; you know they won’t stay on long at home! Before quality and prices took their last jumps up/down, I had gotten a good varnishing brush. I can tell the construction is kind of shoddy but I’ll glue its head back on if it comes off. The brush itself is really nice, though.

Some of my brushes are from the 1980s! Some of those are still in great shape. I’ve taken good care of them. Any time I think I can’t get all the paint out, I leave the brush cleaning lather in it, shape the tip, and just leave it that way until I use it again. That seems to keep paint from drying permanently in the bristles if you have a tough one. Just rinse it out before you paint with it!

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Some of my brushes drying.

Other brushes, especially round ones that are supposed to have a nice sharp point, may not last long as the intended shape. I just go ahead and use them for scumbling or other rough uses. When they splay really badly, they make great ‘grass’ and ‘hair’ brushes, more random and natural looking IMO than the special effects brushes cut to do the same thing. (Top brush in photo above.)

The cheap replacement for it, (middle), has bristles that aren’t packed very tight, so paint can still be up in there no matter how carefully it’s cleaned. I leave the lather in it to try to keep it from becoming splayed.

Bottom brush is a favorite for applying isolation coats and top coats of acrylic medium, as its fine, soft bristles don’t leave marks and it holds a lot. The head is cheaply attached, but I’ve had good luck simply gorilla-gluing heads back on to brushes, so will do that if/when I have to.

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Green!

GREEN!

A women painters group I recently joined decided we all needed to challenge ourselves with the color green, since so many of us said it was our least favorite color. That prompted me to start something I’ve been putting off; making a sketchbook into a color mixing chart like I did years ago and foolishly threw away in one of my many moves. Just started today, with swatches of all the greens I had on hand. Next, I’ll do some mixing samples with other colors to make my own greens. And so on.

The little painting isn’t done yet, and not sure it’ll end up being my “Green Challenge” piece.

What are YOUR favorite or least favorite colors? Are there any premade greens you like or dislike? My favorite ready made green is Golden’s Green Gold. I have others on hand but that is one I would have a hard time living without. It’s quite transparent. Even though I don’t much like green, I like Green Gold. Sap Green is another I kind of like. And, to do the challenge, I made myself buy a small tube of Chrome Green, a color I haven’t bought since I did oils back in the 80s. I kind of like it, so far, but most of it has been covered up in the little painting.